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The University of Miami is currently conducting research on the effects that cycling with functional electrical stimulation (FES-cycling) has on people with spinal cord injury. The research team, led by Mark Nash, PhD, FACSM, and his student, David McMillan, is interested in how energy expenditure and fuel partitioning, as well as cardiac output, are affected by FES-cycling exercise performed on two different FES bikes: the MyoCycle and the RT300.

So far, the team has completed experiments with four men with various levels of spinal cord injury, and the results were recently presented during a poster session at the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) conference in Albuquerque. The full poster is presented below, but the concluding points are as follows:

  • Moderate stimulation intensity FES cycling qualifies as “low intensity” aerobic exercise according to authoritative guidelines (aerobic effect similar to walking).
  • The MyoCycle relies less on carbohydrate fuels and more on fatty fuels at the selected moderate stimulation intensity.
  • The MyoCycle promotes a more extensive excessive post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) for 30 minutes after termination of stimulation.
  • The greater gross mechanical efficiency (23.3% as opposed to only 16.7% from the RT300) observed for the MyoCycle may have implications for more substantial sparing of muscle fatigue accompanying FES cycling.

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What do these results mean?

These are still preliminary results, but there are three key take-away points:

    1. Both the MyoCycle and the RT300 can give people with spinal cord injury a good workout.
    2. The unique characteristics of the MyoCycle cause some interesting positive effects not seen when using the RT300 (more fat burn and greater EPOC).
    3. The MyoCycle is significantly more efficient than the RT300 (more cycling power output for the same amount of calories burned).

 

The research team also collected some interesting cardiac output data from the study, but these results won’t be presented until the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) annual meeting at the end of the month.

MYOLYN is committed to supporting research into the benefits of FES for people with neurological disorders. Sign up for our newsletter to keep up to date with the results!

If you’d like to learn more about how the MyoCycle can help someone with paralysis to get a great workout, click here!

Published in MYOLYN RSS FEED
Thursday, 11 May 2017 15:53

Adaptive Sports

Staying active and healthy despite paralysis through adaptive sports.

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) has a slogan that says, “Exercise is for EVERY body.” Exercise is one of the most effective means for maintaining and improving your health, yet it’s something that few people get enough of. This is especially true for people with disabilities, whose ability to get enough exercise may be limited by social or physical barriers. As a result, many people with disabilities suffer from the effects of a sedentary lifestyle, including obesity, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke.

So what can we do about it?

One great answer is adaptive sports. Sports have long been one of the best ways to stay active and healthy, because they combine social interaction, competition, and exercise into a single activity. Each year, more people and organizations are getting involved in adaptive sports, making old sports accessible to people with disabilities and even inventing some new sports, like Murderball. The result is that more people with disabilities are getting out, staying active, and having fun.

Here’s a list of some of the most popular adaptive sports:

  • Archery
  • Wheelchair basketball
  • Skiing
  • Equestrian
  • Golf
  • Hand cycling
  • Sailing
  • Scuba
  • Sled hockey
  • Snowboarding
  • Wheelchair rugby (aka Murderball)
  • Tennis
  • Waterskiing
  • Wheelchair racing
  • Yoga

Several of these sports even have professional teams, like the US Paralympic Cycling Team.

There are many organizations and events for adaptive sports – too many to list. Below you can find a few great resources for getting involved in adaptive sports.

As a final note, many rehabilitation centers have their own adaptive sports programs, like the Shepherd Center and Brooks Rehab. Now get out and play!

If you know someone who may be interested in adaptive sports, share this article with them on Facebook,Twitter, Pinterest, or LinkedIn

If you’re trying to stay active and healthy despite paralysis, or maybe you’re trying to build strength and endurance for an adaptive sport, the MyoCycle may be right for you. To learn more about how the MyoCycle fits into an active and healthy lifestyle, click here.

Published in MYOLYN RSS FEED

The MyoCycle is a revolutionary stationary exercise bike that uses functional electrical stimulation technology (FES) to empower people with muscle weakness or paralysis to take control of their health.

MYOLYN, a medical technology company dedicated to improving health and human performance, is proud to announce that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) for two of its cutting-edge technologies, the MyoCycle Home and the MyoCycle Pro.

Both devices are stationary cycling systems that use MYOLYN’s patent-pending functional electrical stimulation (FES) technology to empower anyone who has difficulty activating their own muscles. Such systems are also known as FES bikes.

Clearance from the FDA marks a major milestone for the technology startup, allowing MYOLYN to enter both the professional rehabilitation and the homecare medical device markets.

“FES is a very promising technology that can help many people with paralysis or muscle weakness,” says MYOLYN co-founder and CEO Alan Hamlet, PhD. “MYOLYN’s goal is to make this revolutionary technology available to the millions of people that can benefit from it. The MyoCycle is an affordable, easy-to-use FES bike that enables therapeutic, load-bearing exercise despite even complete paralysis. It is a game changer!”

An FES bike is essentially a stationary exercise bike that someone who is paralyzed can use because it activates their muscles for them. The MyoCycle is intended for general rehabilitation for relaxing muscle spasms, preventing muscle atrophy, increasing blood circulation, and maintaining or increasing range of motion following disease or injury. These indications for use make the MyoCycle especially beneficial for people with spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral palsy, as well as people undergoing orthopedic rehabilitation following knee or hip surgery.

“Our patent-pending algorithms automatically select the optimal stimulation parameters for the patient, making the MyoCycle not only effective, but extremely easy and intuitive to use,” says Chief Technology Officer Matthew Bellman, PhD. “Our goal was to make this technology practical for use in the home for the first time, so we designed the MyoCycle from the ground up to be affordable and as easy-to-use as a regular exercise bike.”

FDA clearance enables millions of people with paralysis to engage in a complete continuum of care from the clinic, where the MyoCycle Pro helps to maximize recovery potential, to the comfort of home, where the MyoCycle Home helps people with paralysis to stay active and healthy.

  • The MyoCycle Pro, intended for clinical use, combines isokinetic cycling and FES into a single system that can increase clinic revenue while maximizing patient outcomes.
  • The MyoCycle Home is an affordable, easy-to-use FES bike that empowers patients to take control of their health and get the therapy they need from the comfort of home.
Published in MYOLYN RSS FEED

Considering buying an FES bike and exploring your options? This post is the final part of a four part guide that provides a detailed comparison between the MyoCycle and the most common alternative, the RT300.

Published in MYOLYN RSS FEED

Considering buying an FES bike and exploring your options? This post is the third part of a four part guide that provides a detailed comparison between the MyoCycle and the most common alternative, the RT300.

Published in MYOLYN RSS FEED
Page 1 of 3

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